Tracing the History and Lore of the Hahoetal Masks From Money Heist Korea, Do They Share Any Connection With the Infamous Salvador Dali Masks From the Spanish Show?

Tracing the History and Lore of the Hahoetal Masks From Money Heist Korea, Do They Share Any Connection With the Infamous Salvador Dali Masks From the Spanish Show?

Money Heist fans are delighted that a Korean remake is on the way. But there are some marked differences between the two. The most noticeable difference is the change in the masks, while the red jumpsuits remain the same. Apparently, writer Ryu Yong Jae wanted to add a Korean flavor to the reboot. But are the masks in Money Heist Korea somehow related to the Dali masks in the original Alex Pina version? Let’s find out. 

The Money Heist Korea masks share one common connection with the Spanish version

In Money Heist Korea the robbers are wearing Hahoetal masks instead of the Dali masks. These traditional Korean masks originated in the Hahoe Folk Village and Byeongsan Village in South Korea back in the 12th century. They form a significant part of Korean culture and have the status of Nation Treasure #121. The Korean performers generally wear them to perform the Pyolshin-gut Ta’l nori. The masks represent the social classes back in the day. Additionally, the expressions on the masks are reflective of the dynamics of the different classes. 

While the Dali masks are fashioned from the famous Spanish painter Salvador Dali. He is credited with ushering in the surrealist movement in art. He also served as a major political figure supporting Francisco Franco’s authoritarian regime. Just like Dali’s art scoffed at the capitalist system, the robber’s Dali mask also rejected the capitalist society.

Actor Park Hae Soo, who plays Berlin, in the Korean remake, revealed that the Hahoetal masks were a mockery of the upper-class social elites. Both the masks represent resistance, rebellion, and revolution. It’s a silent protest against the inequality between the rich and the poor in society. 

ALSO READ: Is ‘Money Heist: Korea’ Possibly the Best Remake of ‘La Casa de Papel’ That Can Be?

The Hahoetal masks make sense considering the robbers from both the countries, North and South Korea band together because “the rich are getting richer”.

In the Korean offering, South and North Korea are on the brink of unification. They establish a joint economic area to further their unification efforts. Of course, the robbers target the joint Mint. 

The series premieres on June 24.

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